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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
to pump more money, more stimulus into the economy in hard-hit states like nevada, florida, ohio, colorado, pennsylvania, california than any institution. they may be more important than the fed. we have to look at money and politics. >> this is interesting. the comments from all four speakers. i want to ask about a demographic group that none of you touched on. one out of every five americans has a disability. 51% of likely voters said they have a family member with a disability. at the national press club when there was an opportunity for the romney campaign and the obama campaign to send someone to speak about disability issues, the romney campaign chose not to attend and chose not to issue a position paper on disabilities. i wanted to ask why, given that one out of five americans has a disability, 51% of american likely voters has a family member or a loved one, why is there not more conversation about that demographic within our society and election process? >> the short answer is in an election that revolving around the role of government, if your for small government, why would you
for democrats. virginia, montana are important if the democrats could pick off arizona or nevada. but things have been breaking for the democrats the past couple of weeks, i think. >> brown: you haven't had a chance to talk about missouri. >> missouri is a very interesting state where democrats hadn't been earning more than 50% of the votes even when winning because there were other factors. and and there is a third party candidate helping her a little bit. one interesting thing about deb fisher, it's the first time nebraska is sending a woman to the senate. and in new hampshire, the associated press called the democratic governor won there. she will be the only female democratic governor in the country next year because she's won. >> yes. >> brown: is that something you didn't know? did we stump you? >> there is a sitting woman democratic governor right now, but she chose not to seek reelection in north carolina. >> right, so in 2013. >> brown: and back to you, glen and judy. >> ifill: we find it very interesting to see how all this is shaking out partly because we see what's happening on t
they went to nevada, colorado, iowa, wisconsin, ohio, virginia and new hampshire and these are the ones who have been the surrogates with mrs. obama, no, my husband is not a cold fish. we have dinner every night with the kids. you should know him. you should see that smile. i love him. you should love him. mrs. romney who is very close to her husband in the strategy, she plays a bigger role than just being the wife of, she is the one who said, he is not a stiff man. look at us. and, by the way, you talked about the grandchildren. there are 18 grandchildren. 13 of them are boys. >> all right. let us put that to the decision desk and see what that means. okay, barbara, stand by, team. we know you have so much more you're eager to say and we'll take a break at election night headquarters 2012 reporting on one of the great nights in democracy, one of the great privileges it is to vote as the polls still are open and a lot of this country projections come in and we have more, of course, to report on what social media is saying when we come back. >> announcer: multitouchscenes courtesy of microso
seats in play, and when we get out west, california, washington, nevada, something good could happen for them. but it's going to be hard for the democrats to take over the house. >> brown: there a particular one or two you want to keep your eye on especially tonight? >> a lot of the demographic data we're looking at democrats have area where's they can gain, perhaps later on down the line, arizona, texas, as sturks mentioned, florida is another one, where the democrats are look at making long-lasting gains. they're making new seats. california is another one we will be watching. what is the bigger picture when it comes to the type of members of congress? are these people extreme on one part or the other? the way the lines are drawn that can happen. if you draw a district with extreme democrat or republican, you can end up with extremes in congress. >> woodruff: mark, you were telling me you were off the set talking to somebody, picking up some information about how the vote is coming in. >> the turnout right now is that what tino voters are voting at the levels that the obama people
heller of nevada who won on the republican side, really ran separate from -- not against but separate from the party platform and the president. clare mccaskill, john tester, heidi -- from the dakota, joe donnelly for sure from indiana, these are people who won because they were saying i am an independent voice, i will not be beholden to my party. and i think that you have an opportunity -- whether or not they take it and not is quite another question -- but you have an opportunity to have a new center in the scented. it would be mostly made up of democrats, unfortunately. but i think it will be interesting to watch all of these people and how they behave, particularly when it comes to tax reform. i think it is one place where they could be tremendously influential and be the bridge that sort of gets it done. >> terrific. ice build think we have a microphone assistance. let's -- i still think we have microphone assistance. let's play stump the band -- >> i think it is stump the chumps. >> anybody closer already have a microphone? >> what do you see the relationship between the hill an
a telephone call with a lot of people in nevada. we were talking about challenges there and their home values are down and people are having a hard time making ends meet. the median income in america has dropped over $4,000 in the last four years. they are earning less than four years ago. the same time cost of gasoline has gone up $2,000 a family, health insurance premiums are up, groceries are up. these are tough times for america. so my plan to create 12 million jobs is needed and needed now. it has five parts which number one we're going to take full advantage of our energy, our oil, our coal, our gas. [applause] . and that creates a lot of jobs. not just in the energy sector but in places that use energy, manufacturing for instance uses a lot of energy in many cases and by having low cost energy and we have it and will continue to have it if we take advantage of these resources. you're going to see manufacturing come back to this country. this is big for our country. that's number one. number two, it's a very helpful thing if a nation has the most productivty in the world and we do. i us
. secondly, i had lengthy discussions with the democratic leader of nevada, harry reid, as well as my good friend, george mitchell of maine, on this very question. i came away from these conversations reassured that my independence would be respected and that no party line commitment would be required or expected. and so i've decided to affiliate myself with the democratic caucus, because doing so will allow me to take independent positions on issues as they arise and at the same time will allow me to be an effective representative of the people of maine. one final word. by associating myself with one side, i am not in automatic opposition to the other. i'd like to repeat that. by associating myself with one side, i am not in automatic opposition to the other. in the situation of a republican house, a democratic senate but with substantial powers residing in the minority and a democratic president, no one party can control the outcome of our collective deliberations. as bill clinton might say, it's just arithmetic. in fact, this situation of a divided government has only two possible outco
've got governor martinez in new mexico. we've got brian sandoval, governor in nevada. these are people who are leaders in our party right now, right now. so they connect with what our beliefs are. they generally connect what our police are but this issue of immigration i believe in the last eight to 10 years has become third world politics in our party. where you don't want to talk about it. when mitt romney got into debates about immigration it was like very awkward but he's like what i do with my hands, you know? we've got to talk about. that's what marco rubio leads the charge of every time he talks about anything he talks to immigration, and that is what our party needs to talk about. it's an issue we can't avoid. >> we're going to go to the audience here. just a couple ground close to ask that you wait for a microphone to come around. and that you state your question in the form of a question. so we have a question right here and then we'll go there next. >> hi. outlooks from the cato institute. there seems to be some disagreement on the panel about whether guestworker visas are g
. >> callerare you there? we will try paul and boulder city nevada back your democrats line. paul, hello? >> caller: thank you for c-span. watching the president's comments, he's not going to take a hardline on whether the attacks which are going to go back to the clinton era. i don't understand why this president is not, i mean, as before, i hope we're not seeing a repeat, you know, the progressives and liberals really push him over the line along with labor. you know, he's got to take a stronger stance because the republicans, mitch mcconnell and cantor and boehner, they are not, you know, really acknowledging that the people have sent the message to them. that they want this president agenda, and they want them to work together. they are not acknowledging that. okay, i understand what he's trying to say to take your of the middle class first, but as far as i'm concerned, you know, 39.6%, you know, is more than reasonable. i think after they've had almost 12 years of tax breaks and 300% growth in the last 30 years in the upper 1%, i think they ought to be paying maybe 40%. >> host: pau
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)